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Watch: Timelapse of astronauts putting in photo voltaic array on the ISS


On 16 June present yr, the ISS astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Shane Kimbrough went on a spacewalk. They had been on a mission to put in a brand new photo voltaic array for the ISS, they usually had been even caught on camera from Earth (form of). However for those who’d prefer to get a more in-depth take a look at the latest spacewalk, ESA has introduced two timelapse movies displaying the 2 astronauts in motion.

Pesquet and Kimbrough first needed to take the arrays from their storage space exterior the Area Station. They had been then handed from spacewalker to spacewalker to the worksite, as ESA explains. On the worksite, the astronauts needed to safe the arrays, unfold them, join them, and at last unfurl them.

ESA writes that the mission didn’t go with out some hassle.

“Through the spacewalk a small technical drawback in Shane’s spacesuit required him to return to the airlock and restart his Show and Management Module. This module offers astronauts with steady info on strain, temperature and different important knowledge throughout a spacewalk.”

Fortunately, the restart was profitable and Kimbrough was in no hazard. Nonetheless, this little “hiccup” delayed the astronauts’ work they usually couldn’t end it when deliberate. Subsequently, they needed to take one other spacewalk on 20 June to complete what they’d began.

Within the first video above, you possibly can see part of the primary spacewalk. Thomas Pesquet was being moved on the robotic arm, and NASA astronaut Megan McArthur was on the controls. The second video exhibits the second spacewalk Pesqurt and Kimbrough took on 20 June. As they waited for the evening to reach, Shane’s helmet lights and digicam partially indifferent from his helmet, ESA explains. However Pesquet went full DIY and used some wire to efficiently reattach them as a brief repair. Fortunately, there have been no larger points this time and the second spacewalk was efficiently completed after six hours and 28 minutes. JAXA astronaut and ISS commander Aki Hoshide took the photographs for each timelapse movies.

[via DPReview]



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